ENDANGERED SPECIES

MANATEES


The FLORIDA MANATEE, a subspecies of the West Indian Manatee, is a native of the coastal waters of the State of Florida. These docile air breathing marine mammals average 10 feet in length and weigh approximately 1,200 pounds. Once plentiful, the state manatee population has dwindled due to hunting, habitat alteration, and other natural and man-caused influences. Today, there only approximately 2,500 manatees living in Florida waters.

Manatees are herbivores which feed upon a wide variety of submerged and emergent vegetation. Preferred food is seagrass, mangrove leaves, algae, water hyacinth, and hydrilla. They spend 6-8 hours per day eating.

Manatees can be found in both fresh and saline (salt) waters. They generally inhabit shallow, slow-moving rivers, bays, canals, estuaries and other coastal waters.

Slow swimmers, manatees are particularly susceptible to injuries due to collisions with motor boats. As a consequence, many waterways have been designated as idle speed, slow speed, or exclusionary zones to reduce the potentially harmful interaction between boaters and manatees.

Manatees are protected by the Federal Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 and the Endangered Species Act of 1973. As a consequence, before the Florida Department of Environmental Protection will permit construction in state waters, consideration will be given to the potential impact to manatee habitat and the likelihood of injuries from motor boats.

SEA TURTLE

LOGGERHEAD TURTLES are listed as a "Threatened" species under the Endangered Species Act of 1976. They can be found in Florida's shallow, coastal waters, bays, lagoons, and estuaries.

Adult Loggerheads average a little over 3 feet in length and weigh 200-350 pounds. They feed primarily upon bottom dwelling mollusks, crabs and encrusting animals attached to reefs and rocks.

In general, Loggerheads do not come out onto land, except females during nesting. Each year from late April to September, female Loggerheads emerge from the water, dig a pit in the sand using her hind flippers, and deposit 100 to 125 eggs the size of ping pong balls. Adult female Loggerheads return annually to the beach where they were born.

After about 53 to 55 days, under the cover of darkness, 2 inch long Loggerhead hatchlings dig themselves out from their nest and crawl down the beach to the water. Florida beaches account for one-third of the world's population of Loggerheads.

Loggerhead survival requires that hatchlings find the water as quickly as possible before becoming prey for a variety of predators. It has been discovered that Loggerhead hatchlings may become disoriented by artificial lighting and crawl toward the light source, instead of towards the sea. Such disorientation increases turtle mortality.

To enhance the survival of the species, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection requires applicants for Coastal Construction Control Line Permits to submit a lighting plan demonstrating the minimization of potentially adverse impacts from artificial lighting. The DEP will also require glass windows to be tinted such that interior residential lighting will not be visible from the beach. Additionally, construction activities on the beach will be prohibited during sea turtle nesting season.

FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

LOGGERHEAD TURTLES are listed as a "Threatened" species under the Endangered Species Act of 1976. They can be found in Florida's shallow, coastal waters, bays, lagoons, and estuaries.

Adult Loggerheads average a little over 3 feet in length and weigh 200-350 pounds. They feed primarily upon bottom dwelling mollusks, crabs and encrusting animals attached to reefs and rocks.

In general, Loggerheads do not come out onto land, except females during nesting. Each year from late April to September, female Loggerheads emerge from the water, dig a pit in the sand using her hind flippers, and deposit 100 to 125 eggs the size of ping pong balls. Adult female Loggerheads return annually to the beach where they were born.

After about 53 to 55 days, under the cover of darkness, 2 inch long Loggerhead hatchlings dig themselves out from their nest and crawl down the beach to the water. Florida beaches account for one-third of the world's population of Loggerheads.

Loggerhead survival requires that hatchlings find the water as quickly as possible before becoming prey for a variety of predators. It has been discovered that Loggerhead hatchlings may become disoriented by artificial lighting and crawl toward the light source, instead of towards the sea. Such disorientation increases turtle mortality.

To enhance the survival of the species, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection requires applicants for Coastal Construction Control Line Permits to submit a lighting plan demonstrating the minimization of potentially adverse impacts from artificial lighting. The DEP will also require glass windows to be tinted such that interior residential lighting will not be visible from the beach. Additionally, construction activities on the beach will be prohibited during sea turtle nesting season.





CLICK ON THE PHOTOS
BELOW FOR MORE DETAILS







CLICK THESE LINKS
FOR VOLUSIA COUNTY
VIDEO EXPERIENCES
St. Johns River
Water Skiing
Fresh Water Fishing
Bird Watching
Flora & Fauna
Boating
Water Activities
Photography
Paintball
Sky Diving
Hiking Trails
Antique Shopping



CLICK THESE LINKS
FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY
VIDEO EXPERIENCES
Boating
Surfing
Scuba Diving
Beaches
Deep Sea Fishing
Golfing
Tennis
Polo
Tropical Gardening
Cultural Amenities
Shopping Galore


IS TRANSPORTATION AN ISSUE?
INSERT AN ADDRESS BELOW TO
FIND THE WALKABILITY FACTOR
GO GREEN!
LEARN MORE HERE
ABOUT GREENING YOUR HOME